Fenix E01 Flashlight



Fenix E01 Flashlight Specifications: 

– Uses a Nichia white GS LED with a lifespan of 100,000 hours
– Uses one 1.5V AAA (Ni-MH, Alkaline) battery
– 71mm (Length) x 14.2mm (Diameter)
– 14-gram weight (excluding battery)
– Digitally regulated output maintains constant brightness
– Reverse polarity protection, to protect from improper battery installation
– Reliable twist switch
– Capable of standing up securely on a flat surface to serve as a candle
– Made of durable aircraft-grade aluminum
– Toughened ultra-clear glass lens with anti-reflective coating

Fenix E01 Flashlight
by Bevin Chu
July 17, 2012
Taipei, China

I just acquired a Fenix E01 Flashlight in Taipei for 400 NT (US $13). The Fenix E01 Flashlight is a 1AAA flashlight barely larger than the single AAA cell that powers it. This makes it ideal for EDC or Every Day Carry. It features an astonishingly bright LED bulb that lasts over 11 years. It does not dim as the battery runs down. Instead, digitally regulated electronic circuitry maintains constant brightness throughout the life of the battery. Now how neat is that?

Years ago I owned a Mini Maglite 2AA Flashlight, in addition to a large police use Maglite 5D Flashlight. Maglite was then the pioneer of high tech aluminum alloy flashlights. As its official website boasts:

Often referred to as “A Work of Art That Works®”, the Maglite® and Mini Maglite® flashlights have been honored by the Japan Institute of Design and by the Museum for Applied Art in Germany. Fortune and Money magazines ranked Mag Instrument® products among the top 100 products that “America makes best”. In 1996, the Wall Street Journal referred to the Maglite® flashlight as “the Cadillac of flashlights”, and quoted then-CEO of Apple Computer Gilbert F. Amelio as saying he wanted Apple to be “essentially the Maglite® of computers”.   

But that was then. This is now. Later rivals have since left Maglite behind in the dust. The Maglite Solitaire, a 1AAA incandescent flashlight is cheaper at only US $5. But in terms of performance it does not begin to compare. Among these rivals are Arc Flashlights, Fenix Flashlight, and Inova/Nite Ize. Arc and Inova are US based brands. Fenix is a mainland China based brand that, to borrow a advertising slogan from Taiwan, is “very well Made in China.” As its official website explains:

Progress is rooted in dissatisfaction. A group of young men, passionate about high quality illumination, grew increasingly dissatisfied with the mediocre flashlights on the market. These inferior devices had substandard construction and poor attention to detail. The young men organized a group of professional engineers to head their machining, electronics, and design departments. Together they founded FenixLight Limited. The marriage between ingenuity and craftsmanship led to lighting devices held in high regard the world over.





I purchased my Fenix E01 from Ray Gue Hua Knives in Taipei:
http://www.rghknives.com.tw/product_info.php?products_id=6002

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How to Convert ODT Files into JPG Files Using GIMP


LibreOffice: Writer, Calc, Impress, Draw, Math and Base
http://www.libreoffice.org/


GIMP: GNU Image Manipulation Program
http://www.gimp.org/

How to Convert ODT Files into JPG Files Using GIMP
Bevin Chu
September 17, 2011
Taipei, China

Did you know you can convert your LibreOffice/OpenOffice Open Document Text (ODT) files (or MicroSoft Word DOC files) into GIF, JPG, PNG, or TIF files, using GIMP?

Say you have an ODT (or DOC) file that you want to convert to an image file, such as a JPG (or GIF, PNG, TIF) file. Say you want to display it on one of your webpages as a visible image, rather than as a downloadable file.

All it takes is two easy steps.

Step 1: Using LibreOffice/OpenOffice Writer, open your ODT file. Export the ODT file as a PDF file using the “Export as PDF” command under “File.”

Step 2: Using GIMP, open the just created PDF file. Save the PDF file as a JPG file using the “Save As” command under “File.”

That’s it. You’re done!

You now have a JPG file that will immediately be visible on your webpage upon uploading.

No need to throw away good money for commercial conversion software. No need to risk security leaks by uploading sensitive information to an online conversion utility. Instead, make use of open source software, such as LibreOffice/OpenOffice and GIMP.

Something this elementary ought to be easy to find. But oddly enough it wasn’t. I drilled down pretty deep before finally stumbling across this information.

“GIMP, the GNU image manipulation program, is basically the open source version of Adobe Photoshop. These two programs are frequently compared to each other due to their similarities. However, GIMP was not designed to be a Photoshop clone. Adobe Photoshop retails for around $450. Gimp is FREE. This is a very robust image editing program that allows even the beginner to do some pretty amazing tricks.”

— Bright Hub Review

A Note to MicroSoft Word Users: I use LibreOffice because it is Open Source Software. From what I have read online, the process is similar for MS Word.

How to Convert ODT Files into JPG Files Without Additional Software


LibreOffice: Writer, Calc, Impress, Draw, Math and Base
http://www.libreoffice.org/

How to Convert ODT Files into JPG Files Without Additional Software
Bevin Chu
September 17, 2011
Taipei, China

Did you know you can convert your LibreOffice/OpenOffice Open Document Text (ODT) files (or MicroSoft Word DOC files) into GIF, JPG, PNG, or TIF files, using only the software already on your PC?

That’s right. No need to download and install specialized software useful for no other purpose.

Say you have an ODT (or DOC) file that you want to convert to an image file, such as a JPG (or GIF, PNG, TIF) file. Say you want to display it on one of your webpages as a visible image, rather than as a downloadable file.

All it takes is two easy steps.

Step 1: Using LibreOffice/OpenOffice Writer, open your ODT file. Export the ODT file as a PDF file using the “Export as PDF” command under “File.”

Step 2: Using LibreOffice/OpenOffice Draw, open the just created PDF file. Export the PDF file as a JPG file using the “Export” (not “Export as PDF”) command under “File.”

That’s it. You’re done!

You now have a JPG file that will immediately be visible on your webpage upon uploading.

No need to throw away good money for commercial conversion software. No need to risk security leaks by uploading sensitive information to an online conversion utility. No need to even download additional freeware.

Something this elementary ought to be easy to find. But oddly enough unless you happen to search for it under “videos,” it isn’t. For the record I drilled down pretty deep before finally coming across this information at YouTube, of all places.

In the event LibreOffice/OpenOffice Draw has trouble reading your PDF file, use GIMP to convert your PDF file to a JPG file. See my blog entry: “How to Convert ODT Files into JPG Files Using GIMP.”

A Note to MicroSoft Word Users: I use LibreOffice because it is Open Source Software. Based on what I have read online, the process is similar for MS Word DOC files.

Giant CT 102 to Front Wheel Drive Low Rider Conversion

Giant CT 102 to Front Wheel Drive Low Rider Conversion
by Bevin Chu
Taipei, China
March 19, 2011

Giant CT 102 Urban Commuter Bike

In previous posts I spoke of converting my Giant CT 102 Urban Commuter Bike into a DIY LWB Mid Racer, Low Racer, or FWD Delta Trike.

An alternative might be the following DIY FWD Low Rider Conversions by Robert Horn, of Englewood, Colorado, USA.

Robert Horn’s Super Chopper
http://www.ratrodbikes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=22701&st=0&sk=t&sd=a&start=0

Very few DIY bike designs are as ingenious as these F’Lowroller variants. They are remarkable for their economy of design, and deserve greater recognition and exposure than they have gotten.

They are clearly superior to many better known DIY bike designs that call for the fabrication of many components from scratch. They require only one donor bike, not two or even more. They ingeniously move the bottom bracket / chainstays / rear wheel to the front, and the front fork / front wheel to the rear. The original handlebars can be reused as well. Waste not, want not.

They are more aesthetically pleasing than many DIY bike designs, which often look very “ghetto.” The F’Lowroller variants look futuristic and elegant — almost like factory prototypes debuted at an industrial design expo by some big name bike manufacturer.

Robert Horn’s New F’Lowroller
http://bikerodnkustom3.homestead.com/gallery291.html

Robert Horn’s F’Lowroller
http://bikerodnkustom3.homestead.com/gallery167.html

See: ROHORN Mind Expanding Cycles
http://www.rohorn.com/

Giant CT 102 to Front Wheel Drive Delta Trike Conversion

Giant CT 102 to Front Wheel Drive Delta Trike Conversion
by Bevin Chu
Taipei, China
March 18, 2011

Giant CT 102 Urban Commuter Bike

In previous posts I spoke of converting my Giant CT 102 Urban Commuter Bike into either a DIY LWB (Long Wheelbase) Mid Racer or Low Racer

An alternative might be the following DIY Front Wheel Drive Delta Trikes.

These trikes are exceptionally easy to construct. Their front drive / rear steering configuration is simplicity itself. It obviates the need for either the complex steering geometry normally found on the front wheels of tadpole trikes, or the custom made hubs normally found on the rear wheels of Rear Wheel Drive Delta Trikes.

Homebuilt Recumbent Trike, by Charlie Little of Mansfield, Arkansas, USA
http://www.manytracks.com/Recumbent/clittle.htm

Front Wheel Drive Delta Trike, by Bill “Yoda” Irvine of Phoenix, Arizona, USA
http://www.recumbents.com/wisil/misc/eliasohn/bill_irvine.htm

Front wheel drive and three speeds, rear wheel steering, owner uses it to commute five to six miles daily

Minnesota HPVA FWD Ice Racers
http://members.bitstream.net/~dkrafft/icebike/icerace.html
http://members.bitstream.net/~dkrafft/icebike/icerace.html

These ingenious ice trikes simply flip the rear triangle of a DF bike upside down. Presto! Instant FWD assembly for delta ice trike. Equally applicable to delta street trike, such as the ones shown above.

Lean Steer Recumbent Trikes, by Robert Horn of Englewood, Colorado, USA
http://www.rohorn.com/

These are not quite as easy to build. Therefore I would probably not attempt to build them. But they are beautiful looking trikes well worth studying for their ingenious lean steer design.


2003 Version


2007 Version

Giant CT 102 to LWB Low Racer Conversion

Giant CT 102 to LWB Low Racer Conversion
by Bevin Chu
Taipei, China
March 17, 2011

Giant CT 102 Urban Commuter Bike

In a previous post I spoke of converting my Giant CT 102 Urban Commuter Bike into a DIY LWB (Long Wheelbase) Mid Racer.

An alternative might be the following DIY LWB Low Racers.

These LWB low racers are constructed with a single length of straight tubing. A number of builders have used 1.5″ x 1.5″ x 0.125″ (3.8cm x 3.8cm x 0.3cm) square steel tubing. This single section of mild steel tubing connects the bottom bracket to the rear triangle, and forms the main chassis of the bike. Relatively little fabrication and welding is required.

On a LWB Low Racer the cyclist is seated very low to the ground, almost as low as on a tadpole trike. The low seating height minimizes injuries in the event of a spill.

Leo’s Big Low Rider
http://www.manytracks.com/Recumbent/leonardi.htm#bikes

Homba’s Long Wheelbase Low Racer Recumbent Bicycle
http://www.instructables.com/id/Build-a-long-wheelbase-low-racer-recumbent-bicycle/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jVqNFPh32w4&feature=player_embedded
http://homsher.com/bike/mantis/img/

Head tube

Head tube

Remote head tube with steering linkage

Remote head tube with steering linkage

View from Cockpit

1.5″ x 1.5″ x 0.125″ square steel main chassis tube, welded to bottom bracket

Seat Back Support

Underside of seat and chain idler

Bolted connection between chainstays and main chassis

Giant CT 102 to LWB Mid Racer Conversion

Giant CT 102 to LWB Mid Racer Conversion
by Bevin Chu
Taipei, China
February 20, 2011

Giant CT 102 Urban Commuter Bike

Three years ago I bought a Giant CT 102 Urban Commuter Bike. Now that I am forsaking upright bikes for recumbent bikes, I am seriously considering converting it to a DIY LWB (Long Wheelbase) Mid Racer.

Doing so would put the seat height dramatically lower than it is now, making the bike far safer in the event of a spill.

If I do go ahead, I will convert it to something similar to the following DIY LWB Mid Racers.

Recumbent Share Archive
http://www.manytracks.com/Recumbent/RecumbentShare.htm
Recycled Recumbents
http://sites.google.com/site/recycledrecumbents/home
Atomic Zombies Extreme Machines
http://www.atomiczombie.com/gallery/lwbbents1.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GobWsort58A&feature=related




Bill Meacham’s Aluminum Recumbent, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA




Louis’s Homebuilt Recumbent, Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Brian Bolton’s Yellow LWB, Canada


Rob Szymanski’s Recycle, USA


Steve’s Tourmaster, USA


Joey Wallace’s Black Widow, USA


Larry’s Yellow Bent, Canada


Dan Peterson’s Green Machine, USA

The above DIY LWB Mid Racer Recumbents are variations on the DIY Atomic Zombie TourMaster, shown below.

Atomic Zombie DIY TourMaster LWB Mid Racer, Three Views

The Atomic Zombie TourMaster is a variation on the Easy Racers Gold Rush of 1986, which won the DuPont Prize and set a world speed record as the first bicycle to exceed 65 mph.

Easy Racers Gold Rush LWB Mid Racer

The Easy Racers Gold Rush in turn, is a variation on the Jarvis Bicycle of 1902.

Jarvis Bicycle of 1902, possibly the first LWB Mid Racer Recumbent

As the saying goes, “There is nothing new under the sun.”